Sunday, March 13, 2005

Is There A God?

Yes, of course there is. It's obvious. But I think we believers need to go further then just the simple basic answer. Let me just explain a small portion of what I think about that cemented my decision on the existence of God.

The theory that tries to explain our origin by totally natural means is completely bankrupt. The only other way is if the universe itself is eternal, and even that demands a power higher than ourselves. If you keep going backwards in time you have to eventually find a start. Before this start there must have been "nothing". Nothing is a concept that is impossible to even comprehend. But it would have to be there. Atheists will almost always go to some kind of theory that the universe was inverted...But even that must have a beginning. R.C. Sproul says it best...
"If something, anything, exists then something or someone exists necessarily. In other words, if something exists, then something else must have the power of existence within itself."
To me that means that even if only one solitary atom existed, and I mean one solitary atom, then something MUST have the power to create that atom. It can not create itself and nothing existed before it to spawn that atom. Ex Nihilo Nihil Fit...Out of nothing, nothing comes. That's a fact. You cannot get something from nothing without a cause. No effect without a cause. Now I suppose that I will be answering the usual next question, Where did God come from? That will be another post at another time.

Of course, from this point you do not automatically get Jehovah, the God of the Bible...But in a later issue I will explain why I believe that Judeo-Christian God is the one true God.

I couldn't possibly relay all the reasons why I believe in a higher power in this daily post..But the above is definitely a compelling reason and it certainly makes me wonder how anyone could think that we came from nothing....Which of course is an impossibility. Chance is not a power, it is a word that describes mathematical possibility.

10 comments:

Emilie said...

its understandable. maybe theirs a point for use not to know if their is a god or not. maybe their is a point of us being created? but who the fuck cares. enjoy life as it is.

sorry...

Aaroncoal said...

But to know God, IMO is to enjoy life at it's fullest, because my purpose, my reason for being is known and it gives me peace that cannot be described.

Aaroncoal said...

By the way, no need to apoligize...say what you want. I have decided to keep these comments as open as I can.

CheekyMoo said...

I work with the terminally ill. I always say that people who don't believe in God should work with me for a week. I've seen and heard things that can't be explained any other way than the existance of a higher power. I agree that knowing there is a God brings a peace to your life. I am not afraid of dying because I've lived as a good person. I'd hate to die young but I know something better waits for us. I enjoyed this topic, thanks for posting it and stopping by my blog Aaron.

Jeff Downs said...

Thanks for the post. One problem with this type of argumentation (which you point out) is that it does not conclude with the existence of the triune God. As a Christian, I have not business positing arguments for some other sort of God. For any other sort of God, is no God at all.

If you are going to say that every effect has a cause, why would you arbitrarily stop at God? Why not gods, alians, et. al.

Mr. Black states it as thus:

You speak of the evidence of rationality and purpose in the universe. You would trace this rationality or purpose back to that rational being who is back of the universe who, you think, is likely to have a purpose with the universe. But who is back of your God to explain him in turn? By your own definition your God is not absolute or self-sufficient. You say that he probably exists; which means that you admit that he may not exist. Probability rests upon possibility. I think that any scientific personal should come with an open mind to the observation of the facts of the universe. He ought to begin by assuming that any sort of fact may exist. I was glad to observe that on this all-important point you agree with me. Hence the only kind of god that either of us can believe in is one who may or may not exist. In other words, neither of us does or can believe in a God who cannot not exist. It was just this sort of God, a God who is self-sufficient, and as such necessarily existent, that I thought you Christian theist believe in.... Since, in your effort to please me, you have accepted my basic assumption with respect to possibility and probability, it follows that your God, granted he exists, is of no use whatsoever in explaining the universe. He himself needs in turn to be explain."
The Reformed Pastor and Modern Thought. Van Til

Aaroncoal said...

Jeff, You sort of half lost me there.

I think for some people we need to start out with a very basic argument for the proof of an existing God. Then when that is well established the next question will be who is this higher power. That's when I suggest taking a look at the Bible.

Jeff Downs said...

What I want to point out is the argument you state in the original post, is not even a "very basic argument for the proof of an existing God."

Further more, as a Christian, I would say we have no business giving arguments for some general theism and that God probably exists.

Check out my article "The Triune God, a Transcendental Argument and New Religious Movements"
http://www.rctr.org/2005emnrpaper.htm

It currently is not complete (i.e. there is a section missing).

Third, remember what Mr. Black states Since, in your effort to please me, you have accepted my basic assumption with respect to possibility and probability, it follows that your God, granted he exists, is of no use whatsoever in explaining the universe. He himself needs in turn to be explain."

A. R. said...

You're argument in and of itself denies the omnipotence of God.

A quote straight from your post.
"To me that means that even if only one solitary atom existed, and I mean one solitary atom, then something MUST have the power to create that atom."

Now, let's plug the word "God" into your argument.
"To me that means that even if only one solitary God existed, and I mean one solitary God, then something MUST have the power to create that God."

My argument is that you cannot prove the existence of God. Not through traditional logic anyways. The proof of the existence of God is not in a formula or logical construct, but in the divine intervention of the Holy Spirit bringing about radical change in the lives of human beings.

God cannot be proven to exist. That's where faith comes in.

Jeff Downs said...

A R states:

"God cannot be proven to exist. That's where faith comes in. "

That is about the most unbiblical thing to say.

Romans 1 tells us that God has clearly made himself know. All men know God. But, they suppress this truth in sin.

I would argue for the existence of God from the "impossibility of the contrary." If God did not exist, neither would anything else.

"The God who made the world and everything in it, being Lord of heaven and earth, does not live in temples made by man, [2] 25 nor is he served by human hands, as though he needed anything, since he himself gives to all mankind life and breath and everything. (Acts 17:24).

Faith is not blind.
See
The Problem of Faith (Part 1 & 2), by Greg Bahnsen
http://www.cmfnow.com/articles/pa110.htm

Anonymous said...

Occam's Razor